Cell phone use while driving a

Unsafe Driving in the Cell Phone Era Driver Behavior Behind Dangerous Patterns In the use of cell phones had become so popular that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conducted a study that assessed the potential dangers in the growing use of wireless phones. It was not the first, and it certainly was not the last study to be launched in pursuit of cell phone safety measures. Since the invention of cell phones their usefulness and portability has lent them to mass production and consumption.

Cell phone use while driving a

In fact, at any given time throughout the day, approximatelydrivers are attempting to use their phones while behind the wheel of an automobile. Smartphones have made it easy for us to stay connected at all times.

But that can pose serious safety risks if someone decides to check his or her text messages, emails, phone calls, or any other mobile applications while driving.

Cell phone distraction rates are alarmingly high. We hope with a little information, you'll make the right decision when you're on the road. The following figures were the most up-to-date statistics at the time of our latest research.

If you have any questions, or require more recent information, please refer to our sources at the bottom of this page for more information. Nearlyinjuries occur each year from accidents caused by texting while driving. Texting while driving is 6x more likely to cause an accident than driving drunk.

Answering a text takes away your attention for about five seconds. Traveling at 55 mph, that's enough time to travel the length of a football field.

Texting while driving causes a percent increase in time spent with eyes off the road. Of all cell phone related tasks, texting is by far the most dangerous activity. Teen drivers are 4x more likely than adults to get into car crashes or near-crashes when talking or texting on a cell phone.

A teen driver with only one additional passenger doubles the risk of getting into a fatal car accident. With two or more passengers, they are 5x as likely. Cell Phone and Driving Statistics Fatalities in distraction-affected crashes decreased from 3, in to 3, inor a decrease of 2.

Cell Phone and Driving Statistics In3, people were killed andpeople were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers.

Cell phone use while driving a

Cell Phone and Driving Statistics In3, people were killed in distraction-related crashes. Aboutpeople were injured in crashes involving a distracted driver.

One in 10 drivers surveyed said that, at least sometimes, they send text messages or emails while driving. A majority of respondents supported laws that banned talking on cell phones, texting, or emailing while driving.

Pedestrians who text are 4x less likely to look before crossing the street, cross in crosswalks, or obey traffic signals. They also found that texting pedestrians take an average of two seconds longer to cross the street.While no state has a law prohibiting all cell phone use while driving, employers are putting policies in place banning the use of handheld and hands-free devices.

See how the city of Tulsa implemented a total-ban cell phone policy for employees. Mobile phone use while driving is common, but it is widely considered dangerous due to its potential for causing distracted driving and accidents. Due to the number of accidents that are related to conducting calls on a phone and texting while driving, some jurisdictions have made the use of calling on a phone while driving illegal.

Many jurisdictions have enacted laws to ban handheld mobile. Many distractions exist while driving, but cell phones are a top distraction because so many drivers use them for long periods of time each day. Almost everyone has seen a driver distracted by a cell phone, but when you are the one distracted, you often don't realize that driver is you.

Mobile phone use while driving is common, but it is widely considered dangerous due to its potential for causing distracted driving and accidents. Due to the number of accidents that are related to conducting calls on a phone and texting while driving, some jurisdictions have made the use of calling on a phone while driving illegal.

Many jurisdictions have enacted laws to ban handheld mobile. During daylight hours across America, approximately , drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving, the NHTSA reports.

Handheld cell phone use continues to be highest among year old drivers, according to the National Occupant Protection Use Survey. During daylight hours, approximately , drivers are using cell phones while driving.

That creates enormous potential for deaths and injuries on U.S. roads. The States determine laws affecting distracted driving, but NHTSA provides Federal investments in the locally driven strategies that address the States’ specific needs.

Texting and Driving Accident Statistics - Distracted Driving