Reading response for daddy by sylvia plath

You do not do, you do not do Any more, black shoe In which I have lived like a foot For thirty years, poor and white, Barely daring to breathe or Achoo. Daddy, I have had to kill you. You died before I had time—— Marble-heavy, a bag full of God, Ghastly statue with one gray toe Big as a Frisco seal And a head in the freakish Atlantic Where it pours bean green over blue In the waters off beautiful Nauset.

Reading response for daddy by sylvia plath

While living in Winthrop, eight-year-old Plath published her first poem in the Boston Herald 's children's section. He had become ill shortly after a close friend died of lung cancer.

Comparing the similarities between his friend's symptoms and his own, Otto became convinced that he, too, had lung cancer and did not seek treatment until his diabetes had progressed too far.

Raised as a UnitarianPlath experienced a loss of faith after her father's death and remained ambivalent about religion throughout her life. A visit to her father's grave later prompted Plath to write the poem "Electra on Azalea Path".

She wrote to her mother, "The world is splitting open at my feet like a ripe, juicy watermelon".

'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath | A poem for every day

She edited The Smith Review and during the summer after her third year of college was awarded a coveted position as guest editor at Mademoiselle magazine, during which she spent a month in New York City.

She was furious at not being at a meeting the editor had arranged with Welsh poet Dylan Thomas —a writer whom she loved, said one of her boyfriends, "more than life itself. A few weeks later, she slashed her legs to see if she had enough "courage" to commit suicide.

Plath seemed to make a good recovery and returned to college. In Januaryshe submitted her thesis, The Magic Mirror: At Newnham, she studied with Dorothea Krookwhom she held in high regard. I happened to be at Cambridge. I was sent there by the [US] government on a government grant. And I'd read some of Ted's poems in this magazine and I was very impressed and I wanted to meet him.

Reading response for daddy by sylvia plath

I went to this little celebration and that's actually where we met Then we saw a great deal of each other. Ted came back to Cambridge and suddenly we found ourselves getting married a few months later We kept writing poems to each other.

Then it just grew out of that, I guess, a feeling that we both were writing so much and having such a fine time doing it, we decided that this should keep on.

The sun rises under the pillar of your tongue. My hours are married to shadow. No longer do I listen for the scrape of a keel On the blank stones of the landing. Plath returned to Newnham in October to begin her second year.

She found it difficult to both teach and have enough time and energy to write [18] and in the middle ofthe couple moved to Boston.

Plath took a job as a receptionist in the psychiatric unit of Massachusetts General Hospital and in the evening sat in on creative writing seminars given by poet Robert Lowell also attended by the writers Anne Sexton and George Starbuck.

She openly discussed her depression with Lowell and her suicide attempts with Sexton, who led her to write from a more female perspective. Plath began to conceive of herself as a more serious, focused poet and short-story writer.

Merwinwho admired their work and was to remain a lifelong friend. Plath says that it was here that she learned "to be true to my own weirdnesses", but she remained anxious about writing confessionally, from deeply personal and private material.

Sylvia Plath: Poems study guide contains a biography of poet Sylvia Plath, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis of select poems. similar to "Daddy." The title is an allusion to the Biblical character, Lazarus, whom Jesus raised from the dead. Read the Study Guide for Sylvia Plath. Brief summary of the poem Daddy. The speaker creates a figurative image of her father, using many different metaphors to describe her relationship with initiativeblog.com://initiativeblog.com  · Sylvia Plath - Online Essays and Papers Note: This page is divided into the following divisions: Sylvia the Vampire Slayer an essay exploring the meaning of the vampire metaphor in Daddy, by an English major from Bloomsburg University, initiativeblog.com

Nicholas was born in January  · In the poem, Plath compares her Father to a Nazi, a torturer, the devil, and a vampire. According to scholars this poem is autobiographical about Plath's own father. Despite what Plath alludes to, her father was not a Nazi or a torturer so it is obvious her language is exaggerated for initiativeblog.com://initiativeblog.com  · Sylvia Plath: Sylvia Plath (–63) was an American poet and novelist whose best-known works explore the themes of alienation, death, and self-destruction.

Her novel, The Bell Jar, is strongly autobiographical, and her later poems, such as ‘Daddy’ and ‘Lady Lazarus,’ show great power and pathos borne on flashes of incisive initiativeblog.com://initiativeblog.com Daddy by Sylvia Plath: Critical Analysis This poem is a very strong expression of resentment against the male domination of women and also the violence of all kinds for which man is initiativeblog.com://initiativeblog.com Chantal Chau Analysis of a Key Passage, Initiation by Sylvia Plath In Initiation by Sylvia Plath, the author suggests that conformity and having friends is a wonderful idea, yet the idea of having an individual identity and being an individual is initiativeblog.com://initiativeblog.com  · The electricity of Sylvia Plath’s ‘Daddy’ continues to astonish half a century after its composition, partly because of the intensity of her fury, partly through the soaring triumph in her own poetic power.

Forms of desertion are her subject: first her father dying when she was a child, then the discovery of her husband’s initiativeblog.com://initiativeblog.com /articles/a-close-reading-of-daddy. · Images of victimization in Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy" - of Nazis, swastikas, barbed wire, fascists, brutes, devils, and vampires - are so frantic, imposing, and vituperative that the poem seems more out of control than it actually initiativeblog.com

Sylvia Plath | Biography, Poems, Books, & Facts | initiativeblog.com