Relationship between social media and indian cultural collectivism

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system.

Relationship between social media and indian cultural collectivism

Issue 1, Fall One of the critical elements for a culture of peace is social justice. Perceptions of injustice lead to discontent, non-cooperation, conflict, civil unrest, and war.

Religions have a powerful role in shaping ideas of social justice and legitimacy, and also in responding to perceptions of injustice and illegitimacy—e. To maximize the potential of religions to contribute to peace and minimize those that breed war requires understanding these deep, unconscious levels of knowing and cultural formation; this is more elusive and difficult than addressing direct or even systemic forms of violence.

That religions have played a role in conflict and warfare is well known. We have only to look at current and past wars to see that even when religious differences are not a direct cause, they may play an indirect and interactive role in conflict dynamics.

If we understand why and how religions affect war or peace within and between societies, we may be better enabled to engage the strengths and transcend the limitations of religions in developing a sustainable peace.

One reason that religions may have played a powerful role in history is that they often carry the archetypes, symbols, stories, and worldviews through which people shape their identity, designate their deepest questions of meaning, deal with problems of injustice and suffering, and develop codes of morality and conduct to meet the requirements of community life.

Because they function at often deep and unconscious levels, people are often unaware of the affect of religious symbols, archetypes and identity systems on their values, choices and behaviors.

Relationship between social media and indian cultural collectivism

Nevertheless people are often prepared to die in order to defend or uphold these symbols, meanings, and identity systems.

In addition, through their extensive networks, institutions e. In some countries religious systems are more powerful than political systems, and in others political and religious systems are intertwined.

Indeed, given the importance of religion in many societies, it would be difficult to develop a culture of peace without including religions and the symbols and meanings they hold for peoples as well as the power of their networks.

To the degree that religions are part of the problem, they are also part of the solution Definitions, Terms, Approaches Before proceeding, it may be helpful to clarify how several terms are being used in this paper, and their significance to the topic.

One of the critical elements for a culture of peace is social justice. Perceptions of injustice lead to discontent, non-cooperation, conflict, civil unrest, and war. Various aspects of the relationship between religion and science have been addressed by modern historians of science and religion, philosophers, theologians, scientists, and others from various geographical regions and cultures. Even though the ancient and medieval worlds did not have conceptions resembling the modern understandings of . Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill.

Because of wide variations among religions it is not practical to speak in the singular as if all religions were the same. Although religions are found in every type of society, geographic region, and historical period, religious experience and practice has varied tremendously.

Relationship between social media and indian cultural collectivism

What is essential in some religions is absent or peripheral in others. Belief in gods or God is not universal to all religions, and, although most religions include prayer and rituals, these are not always present or central.

Despite the differences, there are some commonly shared aspects of religious experience. It has also been described as a means by which societies interpret life and develop and reinforce codes of morality and conduct in keeping with those interpretations and the requirements of community life.

And it has been defined as: This is because perceptions of injustice—real, alleged, or imagined—are often significant causes of conflict and war, and because ideas and perceptions of justice play a key role in maintaining a stable peace.One of the critical elements for a culture of peace is social justice.

Perceptions of injustice lead to discontent, non-cooperation, conflict, civil unrest, and war. Perhaps the most important dimension of cultural difference in social behaviour, across the diverse cultures of the world, is the relative emphasis on individualism v.

collectivism. In the United States, the modern relationship between land tenure and the reservation system was formally established with the General Allotment Act of , known as the Dawes Act, and later with the Indian Reorganization Act. The social networking site, Facebook, has gained an enormous amount of popularity.

In this article, we review the literature on the factors contributing to Facebook use. Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence.

The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. Used 16 scenarios to measure tendencies toward horizontal or vertical, individualism or collectivism with a sample of Indian students (aged 19–25 yrs).

Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy